Too many LinkedIn requests might lead to restriction on website

Using LinkedIn as a network tool has both a positive and negative side.  On the positive side, LinkedIn might connect you with individuals in your field that you would not normally have access to without LinkedIn. Outstanding, right?  Well, like the famous cliche states, “Quality is better than quantity” rules true with LinkedIn. Developing a central core of quality individuals could be more successful than joining the “500 plus club” or power users. And if LinkedIn observes users “gaming the system,” the user could end up restricted from the site. To learn more about building a quality and strong LinkedIn network, watch J.T. O’Donnell’s video below or linking here. O’Donnell is founder of Careerealism.com and considers herself an “influencer” in understanding LinkedIn.

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What’s the deal with genetically modified foods?

This controversial concept of raising food through genetic manipulation is under scrutiny by many Americans.  On the other hand, how are farmers going to feed the world as population growth increases every decade?

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HuffPost: U.S. Public lands now emit more CO2 than they can possibly absorb, report says

A sign warns of possible hydrogen sulphide gas near oil rigs outside the Sespe Condor Sanctuary in 2004 in Los Padres National Forest, California. David McNew via Getty Images photo

By Brianna Elliott, Huffington Post

“Oil and gas drilling on public lands in the United States creates 4.5 times more carbon dioxide than that land can possibly absorb as carbon sinks, according to a report that the liberal think tank Center for American Progress …”  To read the complete article, link here.

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North Dakota oil spill website set will notify public about all hazardous leaks

thecontributor.com photo

By James McPherson, Huffington Post

Bismark, N.D. (AP) — “It took nearly two weeks for North Dakota officials to tell the public about an autumn pipeline rupture that caused more than 20,000 barrels of crude to ooze across a northwestern wheat field …”  To read the complete article, link here.

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Inhabitat: Scientists find freshwater under oceans

By Morgana Matus, Inhabitat

“… According to the UN, half of the globe will be struggling to find clean, fresh sources of water by 2030. As countries begin to ramp up their efforts to build desalination plants, the discovery of fresh water below the sea may help ease the pressure on exploding populations …” to read the complete article, link here.

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Whistleblowers can now file complaints online with OSHA

- SurvivingTimes.com staff report

Washington, D.C. — Whistleblowers covered by one of 22 statutes administered by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration will now be able to file complaints online. The online form will provide workers who have been retaliated against an additional way to reach out for OSHA assistance online.

“The ability of workers to speak out and exercise their rights without fear of retaliation provides the backbone for some of American workers’ most essential protections,” said Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health Dr. David Michaels.

“Whistleblower laws protect not only workers, but also the public at large and now workers will have an additional avenue available to file a complaint with OSHA, said Michaels.”

Currently, workers can make complaints to OSHA by filing a written complaint or by calling the agency’s 1-800-321-OSHA (6742) number or an OSHA regional or area office. Workers will now be able to electronically submit a whistleblower complaint to OSHA by visiting www.osha.gov/whistleblower/WBComplaint.html.

OSHA enforces the whistleblower provisions of 22 statutes protecting employees who report violations of various securities laws, trucking, airline, nuclear power, pipeline, environmental, rail, public transportation, workplace safety and health, and consumer protection laws. Detailed information on employee whistleblower rights, including fact sheets and instructions on how to submit the form in hard-copy format, is available online at www.whistleblowers.gov.

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Thirst Project: One billion do not have access to clean drinking water

Actor Pauley Perrette from the NCIS TV show, supports the Thirst Project in Nkamanzi, Swaziland.

Almost 1 Billion on our planet don’t have access to safe, clean drinking water and proper sanitization. That’s one in every eight of us. 4,400 children die every day from diseases caused by contaminated water. That’s huge. That’s approximately one child every 15 seconds. 80% of all global diseases are water-borne and result from drinking contaminated water. These diseases kill more than 2.2 million people every year.

The average distance a woman walks to collect water is 3.75 miles. The task of water-collecting falls on young girls, leaving them no time or energy for school. Without an education, it is nearly impossible to break the cycle of poverty. Lack of access to water prevents every other element of community development from taking place effectively. Water empowers agriculture, education and micro-finance. Without water, there is no life.

Most people aren’t aware of this situation at all, or simply don’t know just how grave it is. What’s worst is that the water is there. It’s right below the ground, but for most communities in these developing nations, they simply can’t reach it because they can’t afford to drill down to it. Water is a human right! Together, we can raise awareness and build wells. It starts with us. It starts with you.  For more information on the Thirst Project, link here.

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NPR: How a robotic arm changed 4 lives

Dee Faught tests a robotic arm installed on his wheelchair in September. Commercially produced robotic arms can cost tens of thousands of dollars, but three Rice engineering students built one for Dee for about $800. Eric Kayne, NPR photo

by Joe Palca, NPR

Houston, Texas – … “The three Rice students heard about Dee in an unusual freshman engineering class. Instead of learning engineering principles from a book, students form teams to come up with engineering solutions for real-world problems …”  To read the complete article, link here.

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