Take the “diet” words out of the family dinner time

Editor’s Note:  Feb. 23 to March 1 is National Eating Disorder Awareness Week.

Sitting down to a family dinner is not a Norman Rockwell moment for many people who suffer from eating disorders.  According to the National Eating Disorder Association, constant discussions by parents on dieting, food fetishes or the desire to lose weight might leave a negative influence on your teen or child’s body image.

“Eating disorders are complicated and vexing problems and we don’t exactly understand the pathophysiology of them,” Dr. Aaron Krasner, a practicing psychiatrist and director of the Adolescent Transitional Living Program at Silver Hill Hospital in Connecticut told Forbes magazine.

In the article, author Dr. Robert Glatter, M.D., says Krasner early hypotheses of the pathogenesis of eating disorders are related to difficulties between parents as it pertains to “mothers milk”:  giving love, receiving love, sharing in food, sharing in food-related celebrations.”  He says there is environmental component with eating disorders. Krasner offers five constructive support and suggestions describing how parents might promote a positive body image in teens and children:

1.     Try to avoid criticizing yourself or others about weight or shape in front of your children.

2.     Avoid talking negatively about food – “I can’t eat potatoes because they’re carbs” or “That cake will go straight to my thighs.” It’s more important to teach the importance of healthy eating and exercise without references to weight.

3.    Compliment children on their talents and accomplishments – a little praise goes a long way, especially when it’s well deserved

4.    Let your teens and children know that weight gain and changes to body shape are a natural part of the growing process.

5.    Have a discussion with your children about their use of social media and what they view in movies and on TV.  Only about 5% of American women have the body type that is portrayed in advertising as the ideal size and shape for women.

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Faster conveyor belt poultry processing might put consumers at risk

When purchasing chicken for yourself or your families’ table, do you wonder if the chicken was processed properly?  With the popular trend toward buying free-range chickens, or chickens not raised from incubators to cages to death, does it really matter if those preferred free-range chickens end up facing questionable unsanitary processing and packaging?

The chicken industries’ bottom line might be playing a role in the disputed safety regulations of processed American chicken.  As more chicken factories speed up their conveyor belts to quicken the poultry industries’ delivery to demanding consumers, could food safety rules be waived and the humans processing the chicken be harmed?

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What’s the deal with genetically modified foods?

This controversial concept of raising food through genetic manipulation is under scrutiny by many Americans.  On the other hand, how are farmers going to feed the world as population growth increases every decade?

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North Dakota oil spill website set will notify public about all hazardous leaks

thecontributor.com photo

By James McPherson, Huffington Post

Bismark, N.D. (AP) — “It took nearly two weeks for North Dakota officials to tell the public about an autumn pipeline rupture that caused more than 20,000 barrels of crude to ooze across a northwestern wheat field …”  To read the complete article, link here.

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Care2.com: Where are the protections for child farm laborers in America?

hrw.org photo

By Crystal Shepeard, Care2.com

“… There are few child labor laws covering the nearly 500,000 children that work on family-run farms. Another 300,000 children work as field hands, some as young as 12 years old. Field hands can perform “hazardous” work as young as 16, jobs that are prohibited in other industries until age 18. These minors can work up to 70 hours per week on summer breaks – even at 12 years old – and still not be in violation of the law. Most of these children, including those on family farms, work on farms that are either contracted with or run by large corporations such as Archer Daniels Midland, Monsanto, and tobacco giants like R.J. Reynolds …”  To read the complete article, link here.

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NPR: Fishery closure puts New England’s shrimp season on ice

Northern shrimp are shoveled into a holding chamber on a trawler in the Gulf of Maine in 2012. Stocks of the shrimp have been declining for several years, leading regulators to cancel the New England shrimping season.
Robert F. Bukaty/AP photo

By Tom Porter, NPR

… “This week, regulators shut down the New England fishery for Gulf of Maine shrimp for the first time in 35 years. The Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission judged the stocks of the popular shrimp, also known as northern shrimp, to be dangerously low.” … to read the complete article, link here.

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Thirst Project: One billion do not have access to clean drinking water

Actor Pauley Perrette from the NCIS TV show, supports the Thirst Project in Nkamanzi, Swaziland.

Almost 1 Billion on our planet don’t have access to safe, clean drinking water and proper sanitization. That’s one in every eight of us. 4,400 children die every day from diseases caused by contaminated water. That’s huge. That’s approximately one child every 15 seconds. 80% of all global diseases are water-borne and result from drinking contaminated water. These diseases kill more than 2.2 million people every year.

The average distance a woman walks to collect water is 3.75 miles. The task of water-collecting falls on young girls, leaving them no time or energy for school. Without an education, it is nearly impossible to break the cycle of poverty. Lack of access to water prevents every other element of community development from taking place effectively. Water empowers agriculture, education and micro-finance. Without water, there is no life.

Most people aren’t aware of this situation at all, or simply don’t know just how grave it is. What’s worst is that the water is there. It’s right below the ground, but for most communities in these developing nations, they simply can’t reach it because they can’t afford to drill down to it. Water is a human right! Together, we can raise awareness and build wells. It starts with us. It starts with you.  For more information on the Thirst Project, link here.

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KING5.COM: Washington voters rejecting GMO labeling law

 

Supporters of Washington’s I-522 say consumers have the right to know what’s in the food they buy. naturallysavy.com photo

The opposition for Washington’s I-522 has raised $22 million to defeat I-522 and had spent much of that by Election Day. Hefty contributions came from Monsanto Co., DuPont Pioneer and the Grocery Manufacturers Association, which collected millions in donations from the nation’s top food companies, including Nestle SA, General Mills Inc., Coca-Cola Co. and PepsiCo Inc.

Under I-522, seeds or foods containing GMO ingredients offered for retail sale would require a label starting in 2015. Some foods are exempt, including restaurant food, alcohol, certified organic food and medicine.

Many of those companies mounted a $46 million defense to defeat a similar food-labeling measure in California last year.  To read the entire article and video, link here.

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